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Carbyne morphs when stretched
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Applying just the right amount of tension to a chain of carbon atoms can turn it from a metallic conductor to an insulator, according to Rice University scientists.

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Tiny laser sensor heightens bomb detection sensitivity
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The plasmon laser sensor consists of a thin slab of semiconductor separated from the metal surface by a dielectric gap layer. Surface defects on the semiconductor interact with molecules of the explosive DNT.  (Image by Ren-Min Ma and Sadao Ota)

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Learn Dutch in your sleep
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When you have learned words in another language, it may be worth listening to them again in your sleep. A study funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation (SNSF) has now shown that this method reinforces memory.

 

Last Updated on Wednesday, 16 July 2014 20:57
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Gene discovery could lead to better soybean varieties for northern United States
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Researchers from Purdue University and the University of Nebraska-Lincoln have discovered a soybean gene whose mutation affects plant stem growth, a finding that could lead to the development of improved soybean cultivars for the northern United States.

 

Last Updated on Wednesday, 16 July 2014 20:56
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MyChart use skyrocketing among cancer patients
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Sitting too much, not just lack of exercise, is detrimental to cardiovascular health
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Cardiologists at UT Southwestern Medical Center found that sedentary behaviors may lower cardiorespiratory fitness levels. New evidence suggests that two hours of sedentary behavior can be just as harmful as 20 minutes of exercise is beneficial.

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Expectant moms turn to 'Dr. Google' for pregnancy advice
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Pregnant women are using the Internet to seek answers to their medical questions more often than they would like, say Penn State researchers.

 

Last Updated on Tuesday, 08 July 2014 10:24
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Two 'Goldilocks planets' that might support life are proven false
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Mysteries about controversial signals coming from a dwarf star considered to be a prime target in the search for extraterrestrial life now have been solved in research led by scientists at Penn State. The scientists have proven, for the first time, that some of the signals, which were suspected to be coming from two planets orbiting the star at a distance where liquid water could potentially exist, actually are coming from events inside the star itself, not from so-called "Goldilocks planets" where conditions are just right for supporting life. The study was published by the journal Science in its online Science Express issue on July 3 and will be in a future print edition of the journal.

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Young researcher discovers source of disco clams’ light show
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disco clam

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Blind lead the way in brave new world of tactile technology
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Study participants had to feel their way around a map

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SEAFLOOR EXPERTS PUBLISH NEW VIEW OF ZONE WHERE MALAYSIA AIRLINES FLIGHT 370 MIGHT LIE
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Seafloor topography in the Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 search area. Dashed lines approximate the search zone for sonar pings emitted by the flight data recorder and cockpit voice recorder popularly called black boxes. The first sonar contact (black circle) was reportedly made by a Chinese vessel on the east flank of Batavia Plateau (B), where the shallowest point in the area (S) is at an estimated depth of 1637 meters. The next reported sonar contact (red circle) was made by an Australian vessel on the north flank of Zenith Plateau (Z). The deepest point in the area (D) lies in the Wallaby-Zenith Fracture Zone at an estimated depth of 7883 meters. The Wallaby Plateau (W) lies to the east of the Zenith Plateau. The shallowest point in the entire area shown here is on Broken Ridge (BR). Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) site 256 is marked by a gray dot. The inset in the top left shows the area’s location to the west of Australia. Seafloor depths are from the General Bathymetric Chart of the Oceans [2010]. Credit: Walter H.F. Smith and Karen M. Marks/Eos

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