Default



Latest Articles

Latest News
Seeing is not remembering
Written by Administrator   

People may have to "turn on" their memories in order to remember even the simplest details of an experience, according to Penn State psychologists. This finding, which has been named "attribute amnesia," indicates that memory is far more selective than previously thought.

Read more...
 
Major Discovery on Spinal Injury Reveals Unknown Immune Response
Written by Administrator   

In a discovery that could dramatically affect the treatment of brain and spinal cord injuries, researchers at the University of Virginia and elsewhere have identified a previously unknown, beneficial immune response that occurs after injury to the central nervous system. By harnessing this response, doctors may be able to develop new and better treatments for brain and spinal cord injuries, develop tools to predict how patients will respond to treatment, and better treat degenerative conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease, multiple sclerosis, glaucoma and Lou Gehrig’s disease.

Read more...
 
Inventors choose to reveal their secret sauce before patent approval
Written by Administrator   

Common wisdom and prior economic research suggest that an inventor filing a patent would want to keep the technical know-how secret as long as possible. But a new study of nearly 2 million patents in the United States shows that inventors are not as concerned with secrecy as previously thought. Researchers found that since 2000, most inventors when given the choice opted to disclose information about their patents before patent approval – even small inventors – and this disclosure correlates with more valuable patents.

Read more...
 
Slick and slender snake beats short and stubby lizard in sand swimming
Written by Administrator   

Shovel-nosed snake

 

Last Updated on Tuesday, 20 January 2015 20:48
Read more...
 
Meth Users Face Higher Risk for Parkinson's Disease
Written by Administrator   

In addition to incurring serious dental problems, memory loss and other physical and mental issues, methamphetamine users are three times more at risk for getting Parkinson’s disease than non-illicit drug users, new research from the University of Utah and Intermountain Healthcare shows.

Read more...
 
Sensing distant tornadoes, birds flew the coop. What tipped them off?
Written by Administrator   

When birds unexpectedly flee their nesting grounds, it may be a demonstration of Mother Nature’s early-warning system that a massive storm is approaching.

Read more...
 
Scientists measure speedy electrons in silicon
Written by Administrator   

The entire semiconductor industry, not to mention Silicon Valley, is built on the propensity of electrons in silicon to get kicked out of their atomic shells and become free. These mobile electrons are routed and switched though transistors, carrying the digital information that characterizes our age.

Read more...
 
Organic electronics could lead to cheap, wearable medical sensors
Written by Administrator   

UC Berkeley engineers have created a pulse oximeter sensor composed of all-organic optoelectronics that uses red and green light. The device measures arterial oxygen saturation and heart rate as well as conventional, silicon-based pulse oximeters. (Image by Yasser Khan)

Read more...
 
People in unhappy places are depressed more than a week a month
Written by Administrator   

People in the country's unhappiest communities spend about a quarter of the month so far down in the dumps that it can harm their productivity, according to economists.

Read more...
 
Low-grade waste heat regenerates ammonia battery
Written by Administrator   

An efficient method to harvest low-grade waste heat as electricity may be possible using reversible ammonia batteries, according to Penn State engineers.

Read more...
 
New liver gives mother of three a life without pain
Written by Administrator   

The itching started when Michelle Linss, now 37, was pregnant with her third child. When she told her obstetrician, they thought it was due to the hormonal changes of pregnancy and would resolve following delivery. But the young El Paso woman was still itching a year later, launching a six-year journey of testing and treatment, worry and waiting, finally leading – with the advocacy of a UT Southwestern Medical Center physician – to a liver transplant in August 2014.

Read more...
 
  • «
  •  Start 
  •  Prev 
  •  1 
  •  2 
  •  3 
  •  4 
  •  5 
  •  6 
  •  7 
  •  8 
  •  9 
  •  10 
  •  Next 
  •  End 
  • »


scienceabode.com

 

 

 

my.scienceabode.com

 

 

 

 



Science Career Guidens

  • Human speech and plant growth
  • Diabetes Research
  • Smallest Triceratops
  • Cancer Treatment
  • Human speech and plant growth